Mozilla Summit: Listen Hard

Listen hard at the Mozilla Summit.

When you’re at a session, give the speaker your attention. If you are like me and get distracted easily by all the people, take notes using a real pen and paper. Practice active listening: don’t argue with the speaker in your head, or start phrasing the perfect rebuttal. If a speaker or topic is not interesting to you, leave and find a different session.

At meals, sit with at least some people you don’t know. Introduce yourself! Talk to people about themselves, about the project, about their personal history. If you are a shy person, ask somebody you already know to make introductions. If you are a connector who knows lots of people, one of your primary jobs at the summit should be making introductions.

In the evenings and downtime, spend time working through the things you heard. If a presentation gave you a new technique, spend time thinking about how you could use it, and what the potential downsides are. If you learned new information, go back through your old assumptions and priorities and question whether they are still correct. If you have questions, track down the speaker and ask them in person. Questions that come the next day are one of the most valuable forms of feedback for a speaker (note: try to avoid presentations on the last day of a conference).

Talk when you have something valuable to ask or say. If you are the expert on a topic, it is your duty to lead a conversation even if you are naturally a shy person. If you aren’t the expert, use discretion so you don’t disrupt a conversation.

If you disagree with somebody, say so! Usually it’s better to disagree in a private conversation, not in a public Q&A session. If you don’t know the history of a decision, ask! Be willing to change your mind, but also be willing to stay in disagreement. You can build trust and respect even in disagreement.

If somebody disagrees with you, try to avoid being defensive (it’s hard!). Keep sharing context and asking questions. If you’re not sure whether the people you’re talking to know the history of a decision, ask them! Don’t be afraid to repeat information over and over again if the people you’re talking to haven’t heard it before.

Don’t read your email. Unfortunately you’ll probably have to scan your email for summit-related announcements, but in general your email can wait.

I’ve been at two summits, a mozcamp, and numerous all-hands and workweeks. They are exhausting and draining events for introverted individuals such as myself. But they are also motivating, inspiring, and in general awesome. Put on a positive attitude and make the most of every part of the event.

More great summit tips from Laura Forrest.

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